Category: press

Pando: How Silicon Valley’s counterculture went corporate and ruined everything

Pando Press ThumbHow Silicon Valley’s counterculture went corporate and ruined everything

January 14, 1992: Tens of thousands of artists, techies, politicians, and counterculture icons converged in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park for a Silicon Valley event unlike anything the industry has seen, before or since.

Organizers called it the “Digital Be-In” — a play on 1967’s “Human Be-In,” which featured Allen Ginsberg and Timothy Leary in what was one of the highwater marks for the hippie movement. Described at the time by Soledad O’Brien as where “90s cyberculture meets 60s counterculture,” attendees of the Digital Be-In dropped acid, danced to bad techno, dropped more acid, and witnessed the latest in digital innovation: from virtual reality booths to a strange new form of information technology known as the Internet.

read more here>>

German WDR Radio

WDR press

German WDR Radio

Check out this interactive online photo/video report about musicians, tech and gentrification in the Bay Area featuring myself, John Vanderslice, Duke Bossman and Lewis Ames. Thank you to the fabulous Andreas Bick and German WDR radio for reporting on this issue!

 

Fox News: October 17-19th, 2014

Fox News: October 17-19th, 2014

“American Payday: The Big Squeeze” is part of a Fox News documentary series covering San Francisco’s economic crisis. It features myself and activists Erin McElroy, Tommi Avicolli Mecca and Claudia Tirado. I show up at minute 3:30.

BBC Tech Tent

Big Tech vs The Little Guy

“Not My City Anymore” coverage starts at minute *17:08*

Google begins implementing the “right to be forgotten”, but we consider whether it is being over-zealous in how it is doing so.

As FaceBook receives criticism over a pyschological experiment it conducted on users without their knowledge, we hear from the company on how it sees itself as a force for good.

And how one San Francisco resident has responded to being priced out of the city by the influx of tech money, by using the technology industry to make a point about itself.

Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with special guest Mike Butcher, Editor of the TechCrunch Europe website, and Dave Lee and Mark Ward from the BBC online technology desk.

Original posting here >>

Mission Local

Mixing Humor and Gentrification Through Cabaret » MissionLocalMission Local

Roberts’ crass depiction of the city as a pimped-out woman taps into a ripening frustration over the effects of a widening wealth gap in San Francisco, the deeply rooted feeling that as those associated with the city’s tech boom get richer, everyone else just gets poorer.

Her cabaret, you might say, is a theatrical answer to the city’s Google bus protests, which have cast the buses that shuttle tech workers from San Francisco to Silicon Valley as the symbols of an entire industry’s footprint on the city.

In a music video for the song, a “24-year-old gazillionaire” techie, accessorized by a glittering gold iPhone, cuts deals with City Hall to get richer, while Roberts and a chorus of old-timey saloon girls sing about their own heartbreak and confusingly fiddle with iPads.

At a premiere event for the video on Wednesday, Roberts brought on stage two Mission District residents, both disabled seniors, who are fighting evictions after decades in their apartments. The event took place at the Gold Dust Lounge, also the location for the video and a landmark which itself was evicted from Union Square in 2012 and relocated to Fisherman’s Wharf.

San Francisco Chronicle

SF Chronicle June 26, 2014San Francisco Chronicle

When Candace Roberts first moved to San Francisco in 2000, the dot-com boom had just begun to bust.

She lived in the Mission. Rent was cheap. By her estimation, it was a pretty groovy place.

The city today, though, is a place that Roberts hardly recognizes, a sentimentalism that inspired the “political cabaret” artist to pen “Not My City Anymore,” a song about how greed, money and, of course, tech have plundered the city she once loved.

Or, in Roberts’ words, how it “beat Fran down and smashed her face into dirt” and then “slowly bent her over, ripping off her skirt.”

Roberts’ crass depiction of the city as a pimped-out woman taps into a ripening frustration over the effects of a widening wealth gap in San Francisco, the deeply rooted feeling that as those associated with the city’s tech boom get richer, everyone else just gets poorer.

Her cabaret, you might say, is a theatrical answer to the city’s Google bus protests, which have cast the buses that shuttle tech workers from San Francisco to Silicon Valley as the symbols of an entire industry’s footprint on the city.

KQED Online: Tuesday June 24, 2014

KQED press‘Political cabaret’ artist sings scathingly of changing S.F.

When Candace Roberts first moved to San Francisco in 2000, the dot-com boom had just begun to bust.

She lived in the Mission. Rent was cheap. By her estimation, it was a pretty groovy place.

The city today, though, is a place that Roberts hardly recognizes, a sentimentalism that inspired the “political cabaret” artist to pen “Not My City Anymore,” a song about how greed, money and, of course, tech have plundered the city she once loved.

Or, in Roberts’ words, how it “beat Fran down and smashed her face into dirt” and then “slowly bent her over, ripping off her skirt.”

Roberts’ crass depiction of the city as a pimped-out woman taps into a ripening frustration over the effects of a widening wealth gap in San Francisco, the deeply rooted feeling that as those associated with the city’s tech boom get richer, everyone else just gets poorer.

Her cabaret, you might say, is a theatrical answer to the city’s Google bus protests, which have cast the buses that shuttle tech workers from San Francisco to Silicon Valley as the symbols of an entire industry’s footprint on the city.

Bay Area Reporter Online: Thursday June 19, 2014

BAR19Jun2014Candace Roberts’ Eviction Blues

Singer-songwriter Candace Roberts has been pet-sitting and couch-surfing, (or is it pet surfing?) for a few years now. Another statistic of San Francisco’ outrageously high rents, Roberts manages to stay in the city she loves by advertising her services on Craigslist.

“We do what we have to do to survive here,” Roberts said matter of factly. “But it’s not a sustainable situation. I can only do it for so long.”

But she wants to stay in the city that’s become her home, and so she moves from place to place, hanging her hat wherever she can so she can continue pursuing her love of music and performing here.

read more

Bitch Magazine Review: Winter 2010 Issue

Bitch_Mag_Honeymoon-For-One-2Bitch Magazine Review: Winter 2010 Issue

Honeymoon For One
Candace Roberts
(self-released)
Mixing equal parts Brenda Lee and Jane Siberry with a twist of lounge, singer-songwriter Candace Roberts’s debut CD goes down like one of those hip modern cocktails whose list of herbal ingredients makes you forget you’re drinking alcohol. With a sweet as sugar voice and lush, layered arrangements, Roberts lifts the mundane to the comically magnificent in odes to consumerist yearnings (“Handbag”), laments about boredom and depression (I’d Rather”), and the tragic (and hilarious) ballad of the guy who keeps falling for lesbians (“Layover Man”). More than just a pretty voice, Roberts touches the mournfully sublime in “Somewhere Else,” a lyrical list of all the ways in which happiness hovers just out of our reach.

Fans of 1980s singer-songwriter Bonnie Hayes will detect a shared sensibility here, and Hayes credit as Roberts’s producer and mentor may provoke an “Aha!” moment (and also explains all that reverb). Like Hayes, whose career hits stretch from Valley Girl theme “Girls Like Me” to Bonnie Raitt’s “Have a Heart,” Roberts matches smart quirky lyrics with a girl group sound and eclectic instrumentation. (She plays keyboard and guitar on the album and is happy to add tubas, accordions, and the odd harpsichord into the mix.) Honeymoon for One brings to mind a whole slew of funny ladies and the songs they sang back in the new-wave ‘80s. Remember Julie Brown’s “The Homecoming Queens’s Got a Gun”? Or when Bernadette Peters sang “Making Love Alone” on Saturday Night Live? How about the Roches? Listening to Honeymoon for One made me realize how much I’ve been missing that breed of singers, that combination of bouncy pop and witty, feminist sensibility. We need more songs like “Say I Do,” wherein Roberts riffs on marrying herself: “Booked a honeymoon for one/ Cost me half as much for twice the fun/ No more Frisbee on the beach, got my boomerang…” – MONICA NOLAN

LISTEN WHILE: By yourself in your kitchen, cooking up a locavore dinner just for you.

Check out the review from Curve Magazine!

Curve pressCheck out the review from Curve Magazine!

Twelve Great Albums For Fall
Thermometers may be dropping but these fall albums are hot!

Candace Roberts, Honeymoon for One (self-released): This cabaret meets girl-group meets jazz disc from San Francisco-based Candace Roberts offers a quirky, varied collection of songs with something for everyone. Among the top tracks: the beatalicious “Layover Man” and haunting “Be Still.”

-Diane Anderson-Minshall, Curve Magazine
(go to review)